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Worksheets


The following synoptic worksheets are provided to help consolidate learning from different areas of the specification. Differentiated versions of these worksheets will also be provided later in the year.

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Worksheet 1: A 'Who-dun-it?'
Worksheet 2: Some sodium chemistry
Worksheet 3: Ways of making copper(II) oxide
Worksheet 4: Finding the percentage purity of iron wire
Worksheet 5: Planning an investigation
Worksheet 6: Evaluating evidence during an investigation
Worksheet 7: Recording results during an investigation
Worksheet 8: Estimating heat changes during reactions using bond energies
Worksheet 9: The manufacture of ethanol
Worksheet 10: The manufacture of PVC
Worksheet 11: Comparing CO2 and SiO2
Worksheet 12: Reactions of a hydrocarbon
Worksheet 13: A comparison of two domestic fuels - cost
Worksheet 14: A comparison of two domestic fuels - pollution
Worksheet 15: Cerrusite
Worksheet 16: Laboratory safety
Worksheet 17: Anagrams
Worksheet 18: Processing results during an investigation
Worksheet 19: Tin
Worksheet 20: Selenium (version 1)
Worksheet 21: Selenium (version 2)
Worksheet 22: Reactions of a double salt
Worksheet 23: DDT
Worksheet 24: Things to think about when you answer ideas and evidence questions


Worksheet 1: A 'Who-dun-it?'

This is flow scheme based on the chemistry of copper. Students are required to identify 10 lettered substances, and write equations for 9 reactions.

Important prior knowledge

Thermal decomposition of copper(II) carbonate.
Reactions of copper(II) carbonate and copper(II) oxide with dilute sulphuric acid.
Electrolysis of copper(II) sulphate solution, including electrode equations.
Reduction of copper(II) oxide using hydrogen.
Flame tests.
Tests for carbon dioxide (including the chemistry of the test), water (using cobalt chloride paper), oxygen, copper(II) ions in solution (using sodium hydroxide solution), sulphates.

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Worksheet 2: Some sodium chemistry

This sheet looks at some of the chemistry of sodium metal - some of which is deliberately unfamiliar. It covers the extraction of sodium, some uses, and some physical and chemical properties of sodium metal.

Important prior knowledge

Electrolysis of melts, including electrode equations.
Bonding in sodium chloride.
Sodium flame colour.
Metallic bonding, including reason that metals conduct electricity.
Reactions of sodium, including ability to write ionic equations.

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Worksheet 3: Ways of making copper(II) oxide

This sheet looks at the chemistry of various ways of making copper(II) oxide.

Important prior knowledge

Reactions of metals with air or oxygen.
Exothermic reactions.
Safety aspects of handling concentrated acids and poisonous gases.
Oxidation in terms of electron transfer.
Precipitation reactions, including ionic equations.
Thermal decomposition of carbonates and hydroxides.
Neutralisation reactions.
Separating pure samples of insoluble compounds from solutions.

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Worksheet 4: Finding the percentage purity of iron wire

A straightforward guided titration calculation based on converting iron to iron(II) sulphate and then titrating with potassium manganate(VII) solution. Although the calculation is no more difficult than many GCSE titrations, the surrounding detail looks worrying. This is only suitable for top grade candidates who won't be upset by a novel situation.

Important prior knowledge

Titration calculations.
Ionic equations.

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Worksheet 5: Planning an investigation

This is to give practice for the planning part of an investigation. The investigation used is to find the effect of concentration on the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using manganese(IV) oxide as a catalyst. Students are guided by questions through the sort of things they need to think about in order to score high marks.

Important prior knowledge

Detailed understanding of rates of reaction including the collision theory, and some practical experience in this area.

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Worksheet 6: Evaluating evidence during an investigation

This is to give practice at the evaluation part of an investigation. The investigation used concerns the amount of heat evolved when acids and alkalis react (restricted to monoprotic acids).

Important prior knowledge

Strong and weak acids and bases.
Ionic equation for neutralisation of acids and hydroxide bases.
Energy changes during reactions measured in kJ mol-1 (calculations not required).
Concentrations of solutions in mol dm-3.
Experience of determining concentrations of solutions would be useful in answering one question.

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Worksheet 7: Recording results during an investigation

This sheet present some sets of results taken from a heat of neutralisation experiment and asks the student to comment on them.

Important prior knowledge

Familiarity with common lab glassware (to understand terms like burette, pipette).

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Worksheet 8: Estimating heat changes during reactions using bond energies

This sheet is designed to help with making predictions or interpreting results using scientific knowledge and understanding in an investigation involving combustion of hydrocarbons or alcohols. It could also be used as part of work on bond energies or combustion.

Important prior knowledge

Calculations using bond energies.
Combustion of alkanes.
Structural formulae for simple alkanes (up to butane, but not 2-methylpropane)

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Worksheet 9: The manufacture of ethanol

This sheet applies Le Chatelier's Principle to the conditions used for the manufacture of ethanol by direct hydration of ethene.

Important prior knowledge

A good understanding of equilibrium.
Polymerisation of ethene.

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Worksheet 10: The manufacture of PVC

This sheet follows the stages by which PVC is made from crude oil and salt.

Important prior knowledge

Fractional distillation and cracking (including equations for cracking).
Manufacture of chlorine by electrolysis of sodium chloride solution.
Addition reactions of ethene.
Polymerisation.
Uses of PVC.

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Worksheet 11: Comparing CO2 and SiO2

This sheet looks at the structures of carbon dioxide and silicon dioxide and their reactions with calcium oxide and magnesium. It reinforces ideas about bonding and structure, about acidic oxides and about reduction.

Important prior knowledge

Dots-and-crossed diagrams for covalent bonds (particularly double bonds).
Giant covalent structure for SiO2.
Extraction of iron (and/or steel making).
Reduction in terms of oxygen transfer.
Exothermic reactions.

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Worksheet 12: Reactions of a hydrocarbon

This sheet gives information to enable students to identify an unknown hydrocarbon as propene and then asks about some of its reactions.

Important prior knowledge

Empirical and molecular formula calculations.
Molar volume of a gas.
Alkenes and their reactions with bromine and hydrogen (including hydrogenation in the manufacture of margarine).
Polymerisation of propene and uses of poly(propene).

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Worksheet 13: A comparison of two domestic fuels - cost

This sheet compares the costs of using anthracite and propane (LPG) as domestic fuels. These are chosen because the price structure is easy to understand (not true of gas or electricity) and the mole calculations are easy to do (not true of oil because it is a mixture of hydrocarbons).

Important prior knowledge

Energy changes during reactions.
Simple mole calculations (mass of 1 mole of carbon and of propane).

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Worksheet 14: A comparison of two domestic fuels - pollution

This sheet compares the pollution produced by anthracite and propane by calculating the mass of carbon dioxide produced per kJ of heat produced when they burn. It also looks at possible sulphur dioxide emission.

Important prior knowledge

Global warming - causes and consequences.
Acid rain - causes and consequences.
Simple mole calculations.
Use of sulphur dioxide in manufacturing sulphuric acid.

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Worksheet 15: Cerrusite

A 'who-dun-it?' based on the lead ore cerrusite (lead(II) carbonate). Students are told from the start that it is a lead ore. The sheet ends with some imaginative writing based on the "history" of the accidental discovery of lead.

Important prior knowledge

Reactions of carbonates (effect of heat and of acids).
Reduction of oxides by carbon.
Precipitation reactions (insolubility of lead(II) chloride and sulphate).
Full and ionic equations.

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Worksheet 16: Laboratory safety

A simple exercise in which students have to think about aspects of lab safety relating to collecting a gas over water under circumstances which might lead to suck back. They are asked to present their ideas in cartoon form.

Important prior knowledge

Lab experience.

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Worksheet 17: Anagrams

This sheet explains how to work out crossword clues involving anagrams and then asks students to solve a number where the answers are based on very simple chemistry. They are then given the opportunity to invent some of their own.

Important prior knowledge

Suitable for anyone who has done chemistry for more than a couple of years.

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Worksheet 18: Processing results during an investigation

This worksheet gives students practice at processing results from an investigation and drawing conclusions from them. The results come from the effect of mass of catalyst on the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Students have to work out initial rates of reaction and then plot them against mass of catalyst for two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. They are then asked to draw conclusions and explain them.

The results give two good straight lines (although best fit lines will be needed) with the slope of one half that of the other.

Important prior knowledge

Explanations for the effect of surface area and concentration on rates of reaction.

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Worksheet 19: Tin

This sheet covers the extraction and uses of tin. It revisits the familiar chemistry of the extraction of iron and of electroplating in an unfamiliar context. Some further questions rely on basic chemical common sense.

Important prior knowledge

Extraction of iron (but not steel making) including the formation of slag.
Alloys (including solder).
Electroplating.

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Worksheet 20: Selenium (version 1)

This sheet asks students to predict some properties of selenium compounds. It reinforces ideas about bonding and reactions of acids.

Important prior knowledge

Relationship between Periodic Table group number and number of outer electrons.
Covalent and ionic bonding.
Physical properties of ionic compounds.
Strong acids.
Reactions of acids.
Tests for hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

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Worksheet 21: Selenium (version 2)

This sheet uses some of the same material as worksheet 20. It asks students to predict some properties of selenium compounds. It reinforces ideas about bonding and reactions of acids, and includes a titration calculation based on selenic acid.

Important prior knowledge

Relationship between Periodic Table group number and number of outer electrons.
Covalent and ionic bonding.
Physical properties of ionic compounds.
Strong acids.
Reactions of acids.
Titration calculations.

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Worksheet 22: Reactions of a double salt

Some reactions of ammonium iron(II) sulphate solution, including tests for each of the ions present, and the reaction with chlorine.

Important prior knowledge

Tests for ammonium, iron(II), iron(III) and sulphate ions, including the ionic equations.
Oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) by chlorine.

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Worksheet 23: DDT

This sheet looks at the arguments for and against the use of DDT in the fight against malaria. The students are given the opportunity to express their own views on the controversy.

Important prior knowledge

Some basic organic chemistry (terms like "hydrocarbon").
Simple understanding of food chains from Biology.

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Worksheet 24: Things to think about when you answer ideas and evidence questions

This isn't actually a worksheet because there aren't any questions. It simply summarises the sort of things which students might need to think about in answering "ideas and evidence" questions.

Important prior knowledge

Nothing specifically required, but students should have met some "ideas and evidence" topics, preferably where some ethical questions arise.

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